Separating waste: domestic chemical waste (KCA)

It is dangerous to throw away domestic chemical waste (klein chemisch afval) with the regular household waste. Examples include energy-saving light bulbs, batteries, leftover paint, liquid drain cleaner. You should always turn in your domestic chemical waste separately.

A large part of the (hazardous) materials in domestic chemical waste can be reused. The steel in batteries and paint tins are turned into nails and steel wire. There are different types of domestic chemical waste.

Disposing of domestic chemical waste (KCA)

  • Is your product considered domestic chemical waste? Usually you can also return the chemical waste to the shop where you purchased the product. Many shops have a collection bin for batteries and low-energy light bulbs.
  • You can dispose of old medicines and hypodermic needles at your pharmacy.
  • You can also bring domestic chemical waste to 1 of the garbage and recycling stations.

Garbage and recycling stations

Easily find all the garbage and recycling stations in The Hague on the map.

How do you dispose of domestic chemical waste?

It is dangerous to throw away domestic chemical waste with your regular household rubbish. Or to pour it down the sink or toilet.

  • Always dispose of your domestic chemical waste separately.
  • Never put domestic chemical waste out on the street.
  • Are you unsure whether an item is chemical waste or not? It is better to turn it in separately as domestic chemical waste. This way you prevent hazardous materials from polluting the environment.

You can dispose of empty packaging for domestic chemical waste with the regular household rubbish. For example, empty tins of paint or empty bottles of turpentine or gasoline. These may not be thrown away in the container for plastic packaging, tin and drink cartons.

Types of domestic chemical waste

Here you will find a list of the most common types of chemical waste found in households.

Household

  • batteries
  • (broken) rechargeable batteries
  • pesticides and insecticides
  • lamp oil
  • petroleum
  • low-energy light bulbs
  • fluorescent lamps
  • liquid drain cleaner

From the medicine chest

  • medicines
  • hypodermic needles
  • mercury thermometers

Home improvement products

  • used paint related products such as turpentine, thinner, paint stripper, paint thinner, paint brush cleaner, brush softener and gasoline
  • mercury switches (such as ‘non-digital’ heating thermostats)
  • paint, lacquer, wood stain

Hobbies

  • etching liquids such as saltpetre acid and sulphuric acid
  • photo fixatives
  • photo development products
  • hydrochloric acid

Vehicles

  • batteries
  • fuel
  • engine oil, used oil and brake oil
  • oil filters
Also see: Waste and recycling

Published: 23 January 2017Modified: 9 May 2019